paris

// A LAIDBACK APPROACH AT HERMÈS //

Véronique Nichanian celebrated her first three decades as Hermès' menswear artistic director last year, and she managed to keep her finger on the pulse with this last collection.

Sensing the modern man's current need for ease, relaxed shapes and simplicity, she loosened the silhouette this time and reduced her color palette, too, sticking to neutral tones with occasional dashes of color. The key item within the collection was the pant, and the French designer paid particular attention to volume and proportion. Most styles were long and baggy, with the exception of a few cropped numbers that looked perfectly appropriate with the brand's new leather sandals.

Nichanian also used prim checks and pajama style stripes -mainly for coats and shirting- to evoke an informal feeling, which gave the collection a holiday vibe. Of course, the French House is all about intricate luxury, and buttersoft leather pants looked as cozy as an old pair of jeans. For the show finale, Nichanian crafted exquisite printed pieces, which looked refined and nonchalant at once. Loose shirts were styled with cropped stripy pants and foulard printed jackets looked slim and elegant. It was smart from Nichanian to refer to the House's unique heritage while keeping the silhouette cool and minimal. The beauty and precision of those prints were enough to win you over.

/ Words by Philippe Pourhashemi /

/ Backstage pictures by Geordie Wood /

/ Runway pictures by Jean-François José /


// A LONGING FOR TRUE BEAUTY AT BERLUTI //

Showcased in the sunny and peaceful Luxembourg Gardens, Berluti’s last collection -designed by Kris Van Assche- was a tribute to timeless beauty and meticulous craftsmanship. The Belgian designer was searching for new and contemporary ways to reinterpret the cherished notion of elegance and his vision came to life seamlessly.

Tailoring was one of the show’s strongest points, as it looked equally great on men and women. Double-breasted, sleeveless, fitted or elongated, the jacket was a key garment within the collection and it gave a reassuring sense of structure from the very first look. Van Assche used tailored lines as a canvas to express a more personal vision of luxury, made modern through his use of embellishment and controlled exuberance. Cropped and colorful bombers were worn over jackets and pants. Dreamy feathers also appeared on sharp-looking suits, while chunky chains adorned sleek city bags.

If formality is a Berluti trademark, Van Assche also wanted to underline a more sensitive and spontaneous approach towards the brand, which was evidenced in his stunning use of color. Seeing orange, purple, chartreuse yellow, bright blues and fuchsia pink on the runway was a feast for the eyes, as it added an uplifting vibe to the brand’s proposal. Garments referring to motorcycle gear gave a dynamic edge to the line-up, and Van Assche kept exploring the boundaries between sporty and dressy. A sleeveless jacket, worn with a baggy pair of shorts and graphic sneakers, propelled the brand into our present time, nicely connecting the speed of the street with the patience of craft.


/ Words by Philippe Pourhashemi /

/ Backstage pictures by Merel Hart /